Self Isolation and Social Distancing

Download the Aboriginal Health and Medical Service of NSW fact sheet on self-isolation.

Self-isolation or Social Distancing?

Self isolation is different to social distancing!
Self-isolation means staying at home for 14 days if you are in a high-risk group – such as having returned from overseas or had contact with a person who tested positive for COVID19.
Social distancing, on the other hand, should be practised by all of us and involves avoidance of unnecessary contact with others.

The Aboriginal Health and Medical Service of NSW has published a two page fact sheet on self-isolation (or home-isolation), what it is and who should practise it.

Self-isolation

Self-isolation should also be practised if you have recently returned from overseas, had contact with a person who tested positive for COVID-19, have had concat with someone whom you believe may be positive,  or have been in contact with someone who has recently returned from overseas. Self isolation means staying at home for 14 days if you are in one of the groups outlined in the Aboriginal Health and Medical Service of NSW’s fact sheet. The fact sheet also explains what home-isolation means and what you can do to help protect yourself, your family and your community during this pandemic (a pandemic is  an outbreak of a disease that occurs over a wide geographic area and affects an exceptionally high proportion of the population).

Please read the fact sheet carefully to understand the importance of self-isolation (also referred to as home-isolation).

Social Distancing

Social distancing includes staying at home unless is absolutely necessary, keeping 1.5 metres away from others, avoiding direct physical contact, avoiding public gatherings. Full details of how to practise social distancing are available on the Australian Government Department of Health website.